gravity-for-fish:

Sometimes I question why I study Archaeology, and then I see things like this and lose my shit with excitement.

gravity-for-fish:

Sometimes I question why I study Archaeology, and then I see things like this and lose my shit with excitement.

urbanmancy:

Sketch from holiday, looking into the long Barrow at Avebury.
#sketch #barrow #avebury #tomb #neolithic #ancient #england #megalith

urbanmancy:

Sketch from holiday, looking into the long Barrow at Avebury.
#sketch #barrow #avebury #tomb #neolithic #ancient #england #megalith

mammothsteppe:

French artist Gilles Tosello illustrates the archeological process, or how to find treasure in trash.

mammothsteppe:

French artist Gilles Tosello illustrates the archeological process, or how to find treasure in trash.

robyn-la:

One drawing is done!

robyn-la:

One drawing is done!

robyn-la:

Second illustration finished! Just one side~

robyn-la:

Second illustration finished! Just one side~

fuckyeahvikingsandcelts:

This one is last’s week ‘find of the week’ piece. I’ll quote the caption that accompanied the pictures on the Gotland Archaeological School’s Facebook page:

Find of the week!

The first week of the excavation has been very exciting. We have a lot of possible features that will be investigated in the week that follows but also a lot of finds. Among the finds we have beads, rivets, knifes, wetstones and raw material such as amber, garnets and glass. We took the democratic decision in the field to have a vote on what this week’s “find of the week” would be and the winner was a small silver ornament attached to a piece of bronze. The ornament was originally a piece of a fish head shaped pendant, type 2a (Thunmark-Nylén, 1998:163).The fish head shaped pendant is a unique type of Gotlandic jewelry. The type has its precursors in the Vendel period and exists later in its developed form in the Viking period. Its purpose was to decorate the collar of the female garb. The pendant is unusual outside of Gotland but has been found in small amounts in Birka, Sigtuna, Denmark and Latvia (Thunmark-Nylén, 2006:198ff). During the Vendel period and the early Viking Age the pendants were used together to form a necklace, during the late Viking Age the pendants were put together in couples and used as a brooch. The find was discovered by team 1 and is dated to the late Viking Age, roughly the 11th century. What will next week’s find be? Or will it possibly be “feature of the week” instead?

References

Thunmark-Nylén, L. 1998. Die Wikingerzeit Gotlands II. (The Viking Age of Gotland, II.) Kungl. Vitterhetens Historie och Antikvitets Akademin, Stockholm, 18 pp + 316 Pl. ISBN 91-7402-287-3. 

Thunmark-Nylén, L. 2006. Die Wikingerzeit Gotlands III:1-2. Text. (The Viking Age of Gotland, III:1-2. Text.) Kungl. Vitterhetens Historie och Antikvitets Akademin, Stockholm, 730 pp., ISBN 91-7402-354-3, 91-7402-355-1.

albertoguerra:

Cormorant palace, sketch in situ; Acanceh, Yucatan

albertoguerra:

Cormorant palace, sketch in situ; Acanceh, Yucatan

(via scientificillustration)

Yesterday was the Summer Solstice so here’s a quick update to celebrate (though I’m still in Germany on an excavation)

Stonehenge on summer solstice, with the sun rising behind the slaughter stone in the middle distance, seen from the four standing rocks in the foreground. 
Etching
Bertram Buchanan

Yesterday was the Summer Solstice so here’s a quick update to celebrate (though I’m still in Germany on an excavation)

Stonehenge on summer solstice, with the sun rising behind the slaughter stone in the middle distance, seen from the four standing rocks in the foreground.

Etching

Bertram Buchanan

mediumaevum:

Decoding Anglo-Saxon art

Rosie Weetch, curator and Craig Williams, illustrator, British Museum

(via scientificillustration)

Excuse the radio silence, two of us are away on fieldwork in Germany

Arrow Head