jazmininlondon:

Relatively pleased with my work in archaeological illustration, harder than it looks! #archaeology #flint #lithics #illustration

jazmininlondon:

Relatively pleased with my work in archaeological illustration, harder than it looks! #archaeology #flint #lithics #illustration

design-is-fine:

Thomas Davison, The Fates, 1818. Originally situated as a group of three female figures at the Parthenon, or Temple of Minerva at Athens. Via Getty Open Content.

design-is-fine:

Thomas Davison, The Fates, 1818. Originally situated as a group of three female figures at the Parthenon, or Temple of Minerva at Athens. Via Getty Open Content.

(via princessedesfees)

naseilen:

Blashemer from Mózgowo, one of anthropomorphic stone figures, probably of medieval origins found in the region of Warmia and Masuria. Most of scholars believe, that figures were made by Old Prussians. Statues most probably are representation of Prussian warriors (most of them are holding horn or/and weapon), but their function is unknown. There is plenty of theories: stones may commemorate great warriors (or /and ancestors), people died far a way from home (as a form of cenotaph) or just are boundary markers of different Prussian tribes, or everything above at once. They are quite unique for the region they were found, but similar sculptures were found in South-East Europe and Asia thus a lot of research to check their correlations is still needed. 
This drawing was based on a photo, it can’t be treated as reliable source. It’s been a while since I touched the real sculpture for the last time, so it’s highly possible that I missed or confused some details. 
Blashemer  and three other figures are currently exposed on lawn near Archaeological Museum in Gdańsk.

naseilen:

Blashemer from Mózgowo, one of anthropomorphic stone figures, probably of medieval origins found in the region of Warmia and Masuria. Most of scholars believe, that figures were made by Old Prussians. Statues most probably are representation of Prussian warriors (most of them are holding horn or/and weapon), but their function is unknown. There is plenty of theories: stones may commemorate great warriors (or /and ancestors), people died far a way from home (as a form of cenotaph) or just are boundary markers of different Prussian tribes, or everything above at once. They are quite unique for the region they were found, but similar sculptures were found in South-East Europe and Asia thus a lot of research to check their correlations is still needed. 

This drawing was based on a photo, it can’t be treated as reliable source. It’s been a while since I touched the real sculpture for the last time, so it’s highly possible that I missed or confused some details. 

Blashemer  and three other figures are currently exposed on lawn near Archaeological Museum in Gdańsk.

momiji-no-monogatari:

Munich, exposition about Pompeji, spring 2014
Helmet of a Murmillo (type of gladiator) with depictions of 5 muses on the forehead. 1st century AD

momiji-no-monogatari:

Munich, exposition about Pompeji, spring 2014

Helmet of a Murmillo (type of gladiator) with depictions of 5 muses on the forehead. 1st century AD

theolduvaigorge:

A critical look at evidence from La Chapelle-aux-Saints supporting an intentional Neandertal burial
  • by Harold L. Dibble, Vera Aldeias, Paul Goldberg, Shannon P. McPherron, Dennis Sandgathe and Teresa E. Steele
"In a paper based on recent excavations and analysis of recovered material at the French Middle Paleolithic site of La Chapelle-aux-Saints, Rendu et al. (2014) concluded that there is sufficient evidence to support the long-held interpretation that the Neandertal remains found in the bouffia Bonneval locality represents an intentional Neandertal burial. This paper critically examines their data and arguments inrelation to criteria that can be used to provide an objective evaluation of such evidence. In each case, theevidence from La Chapelle-aux-Saints either fails to meet these criteria or supports other interpretations equally well. As a result, this site fails to provide unequivocal evidence in support of the notion that Neandertals intentionally interred their dead, whether in any ritualistic or symbolic context or not” (read more/open access).
***Always a fun topic. I have this bookmarked, but I’ll note preliminarily that I like their phrasing in the abstract: this site doesn’t provide unequivocal evidence. I wonder what’s in the paper. ( :
(Open access source: Journal of Archaeological Science, in press 2014 via Academia.edu; top image: Emmanuel Roudier)
ri-science:

Drawings from Pettigrew:
Fig. 1 - Gold plate found upon the tongue of a mummy
Fig. 2 - The outer bandages as they appeared on Dr. Lee’s mummy, showing also the position of the leather Amulet over the heart
Fig. 3 - The second layer of bandages 
Fig. 4 - Sycamore Sarcophagus which contained Dr. Perry’s mummy
Fig. 5 - Peruvian mummy at the museum of the Royal College of Surgeons
 from ‘A History of Egyptian Mummies' by Thomas Pettigrew, 1834
Royal Institution Rare Book Collection

ri-science:

Drawings from Pettigrew:

  • Fig. 1 - Gold plate found upon the tongue of a mummy
  • Fig. 2 - The outer bandages as they appeared on Dr. Lee’s mummy, showing also the position of the leather Amulet over the heart
  • Fig. 3 - The second layer of bandages 
  • Fig. 4 - Sycamore Sarcophagus which contained Dr. Perry’s mummy
  • Fig. 5 - Peruvian mummy at the museum of the Royal College of Surgeons

 from ‘A History of Egyptian Mummies' by Thomas Pettigrew, 1834

Royal Institution Rare Book Collection

(via scientificillustration)

west-slavs:

Early medieval types of pottery from Mikulčice, Czech Republic (then: Great Moravian empire); West Slavic culture.
Source: Sebastian Brather “Archäologie der westlichen Slawen”, 2008 [online read].

west-slavs:

Early medieval types of pottery from Mikulčice, Czech Republic (then: Great Moravian empire); West Slavic culture.

Source: Sebastian Brather “Archäologie der westlichen Slawen”, 2008 [online read].

west-slavs:

Reconstruction of the early Slavic pit houses discovered in Desau-Mosigkau, Saksony, Germany [pic 1-3] and Roztoky, Czech Republic [pic 4].
Source: Sebastian Brather “Archäologie der westlichen Slawen”, 2008 [online read].

west-slavs:

Reconstruction of the early Slavic pit houses discovered in Desau-Mosigkau, Saksony, Germany [pic 1-3] and Roztoky, Czech Republic [pic 4].

Source: Sebastian Brather “Archäologie der westlichen Slawen”, 2008 [online read].

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robyn-la:

Quick sketches while analysing lithics today! They turned out pretty well~

robyn-la:

Quick sketches while analysing lithics today! They turned out pretty well~

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